How a Glendale Electric Motor Works

Everyone in Glendale has probably played with magnets at some point while growing up. You learned that each magnet has two ends. Scientifically they are known as the north pole and the south pole. Their names refer to the fact that when the magnet is suspended freely, the north pole will always point towards the Earth’s magnetic North Pole. When playing with magnets it’s easy to see that the like ends of two magnets repel each other while the opposite ends attract each other.

Find out how an electric motor works!In an electric motor, electrical energy is changed into rotational energy. The repelling and attracting forces of magnets are what produce rotation in an electric motor. Some electric motors use a combination of magnets and electromagnets.

An electromagnet is created when an electric current is passed through a coil of wire magnetizing the coil of wire, but the coil stops acting as a magnet when the current is discontinued. So when an electric charge is passed through a looped circuit it creates a magnetic field, or an electromagnet.

The basic parts of an electric motor consist of the rotor, the stator, and the windings. The rotor contains conductors to carry currents that when acted upon by the magnetic field of the stator creates enough force to turn the axle.

The stator is the stationary part of the electromagnet.

The windings are wires wrapped around a core forming magnetic poles when a current is passed through.

A simple electric motor contains an electromagnet with a wire circuit which electricity passes through. This results in an area of negative polarity and an area of positive polarity. As the electromagnet interacts with a fixed magnet inside the electric motor, the repelling and attracting forces of the magnetic poles produce rotation. As the electromagnet rotates it turns an axle that produces the mechanical work of the electric motor. Most electric motors today run on alternating current or AC. To keep the axle rotating it’s necessary that the polarity of the electromagnet change the direction of its flow, or alternate, many times per second. This is necessary to prevent the poles from simply aligning and stopping the motor. Today’s appliances that plug into an electric outlet run on alternating current.

There are also specific uses for direct current or DC motors. Motors operating on direct current receive their energy from a battery. What establishes whether an electric motor is AC or DC is how the polarity is changed. The direct current electric motor contains a component called a commutator to alternate the direction of current into the electromagnet, thus reversing the polarity.

Today, although we use electric motors in practically every household appliance, from fans to air conditioners to pool pumps, most Glendale residents are inexperienced at electric motor repair. It often only takes only one day without one of our needed appliances to send us scurrying after a Glendale motor repair specialist.

If you are in need of electric motor repair or replacement, the Glendale motor repair specialists at Run 'Em Again Electric Motors possess over 50 years of combined experience in rebuilding and repairing electric motors and pumps in Glendale for both residential and commercial needs. In addition we carry a large variety of rebuilt and new Glendale electric motors and pumps and we stock parts for most major electric motor and pump manufacturers.

We also offer proffessional Tolleson AZ electric motor repairs.

John Hayden Owner of Run Em Again Electric MotorsPublished By:

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5618 N. 51st Ave
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